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Showing posts from August, 2011

Plant based diet study debunks eating for your blood type for weight loss, health

You may have read that it's important to eat certain foods based on your blood type. Depending on whether your blood type is O, A, B or AB, proponents of the blood type diet say there are foods to eat and foods to avoid for optimal health and a longer life.  Can eating certain foods based on blood type really help you live longer? The blood type diet was first introduced in 1996 by a naturopathic physician, Peter D'Adamo who alleges that even the spices you put on your food could contribute to better health and should be individualized for your specific blood type.  The theory is that certain foods and even the type of exercise you do should be individualized.  For instance, if you have type O blood you should eat plenty of meat and fish protein, vegetables and fruits but stay away from legumes - at least so the dietary guidelines say.  Recommendations for weight loss include avoiding dairy, corn and wheat and filling up on red meat, broccoli, spinach and olive oil.  Type A ind

Synthetic compound SRT1720 helps obese mice live longer

Researchers are testing the effect of a synthetic resveratrol stimulator, known as SRT1720 to see if it might treat human diseases, reverse metabolic syndrome and help people live longer. In mouse studies, the compound did just that. The compound has been suggested to have anti-aging properties from past studies. SRT1720 activates a class of enzymes known as sirtuins , which are associated with the same positive health effects as calorie restriction. In obese mice, scientists found improved liver, heart and pancreas function, compared to mice not given the patented compound. The study is a collaborative effort of the National Institute on aging (NIA) and the drug company Sirtris, a GlaxoSmithKline company , and is published in the August 18, 2011, issue of Scientific Reports . Drug suppresses gene pathway linked to aging “This study has interesting implications for research on the biology of aging. It demonstrates that years of healthy life can be extended in a