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Showing posts from May, 2016

Almost 16,000 COVID-19 patients get hydroxychloroquine and here's what happened

In a new study from Brigham and Women’s hospital, nearly 16,000 patient outcomes were analyzed that were diagnosed with COVID-19 and received the drug hydroxychloroquine.
Instead of improving, patients were four times more likely to experience dangerous heart irregularity, compared to those not teated with the antimalarial drug.
Patients in the study that were given hydroxychloroquine were also more likely to die.
The study is recently published in the medical journal The Lancet  and is the most recent to address a hot topic about whether the medication, which is also prescribed to treat autoimmune disorders, should be  used to treat COVID-19.
Mandeep R. Mehra, a corresponding study author and executive director of the Brigham’s Center for Advanced Heart  Disease said the drug, or any regimen including a chloroquine,  did not help “no matter which way you examine the data.”
Patients from six continents included 
The researchers looked at data from 671 hospitals that included six continents …

Does so-called good cholesterol really protect from heart disease?

A new study challenges the notion that HDL or so-called good cholesterol protects us from heart disease.
Findings published by University of Maryland researchers suggests maybe we shouldn't be comfortable with the notion that HDL or high density lipoproteins in our blood are an indicator that our heart disease risk is low.
First study reveals more about HDL cholesterol not so protective effect
The researchers looked at cohort data from 25 years from the Framingham Heart Study. The focus was to determine the impact of high triglyceride levels, "bad", or LDL cholesterol and HDL on heart disease risk.
Men and women without heart disease were followed between 1987 and 2011. The study included 3,590 men and women.
What the researchers found is that HDL cholesterol's protective effect isn't exactly what we thought.
Senior author Michael Miller, MD, professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and preventive cardiologist at the Uni…