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Showing posts from September, 2010

Plant based diet study debunks eating for your blood type for weight loss, health

You may have read that it's important to eat certain foods based on your blood type. Depending on whether your blood type is O, A, B or AB, proponents of the blood type diet say there are foods to eat and foods to avoid for optimal health and a longer life.  Can eating certain foods based on blood type really help you live longer? The blood type diet was first introduced in 1996 by a naturopathic physician, Peter D'Adamo who alleges that even the spices you put on your food could contribute to better health and should be individualized for your specific blood type.  The theory is that certain foods and even the type of exercise you do should be individualized.  For instance, if you have type O blood you should eat plenty of meat and fish protein, vegetables and fruits but stay away from legumes - at least so the dietary guidelines say.  Recommendations for weight loss include avoiding dairy, corn and wheat and filling up on red meat, broccoli, spinach and olive oil.  Type A ind

Survey Finds Marijuana not a Gateway for Teen Drug use

Researchers find that that pot smoking among teens is not a gateway that leads to harder drug use. Instead, policy makers should focus on other factors found in a survey that influence teen drug use, that include race, ethnicity, stress and unemployment The biggest predictor of illicit drug use among teens was found to be race and ethnicity, according to research from University of New Hampshire. Pot smoking and use of illicit drugs among teens fades with lower stress levels, found from a survey of 1,286 young adults. Gateway to Harder Drugs from Marijuana Short-Lived By age 21, the risk of marijuana's gateway effect to harder drugs subsides. The researchers say, “While marijuana use may serve as a gateway to other illicit drug use in adolescence, our results indicate that the effect may be short-lived, subsiding by age 21. Interestingly, age emerges as a protective status above and beyond the other life statuses and conditions considered here. We find that respondents ‘age