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Showing posts from June, 2017

Almost 16,000 COVID-19 patients get hydroxychloroquine and here's what happened

In a new study from Brigham and Women’s hospital, nearly 16,000 patient outcomes were analyzed that were diagnosed with COVID-19 and received the drug hydroxychloroquine.
Instead of improving, patients were four times more likely to experience dangerous heart irregularity, compared to those not teated with the antimalarial drug.
Patients in the study that were given hydroxychloroquine were also more likely to die.
The study is recently published in the medical journal The Lancet  and is the most recent to address a hot topic about whether the medication, which is also prescribed to treat autoimmune disorders, should be  used to treat COVID-19.
Mandeep R. Mehra, a corresponding study author and executive director of the Brigham’s Center for Advanced Heart  Disease said the drug, or any regimen including a chloroquine,  did not help “no matter which way you examine the data.”
Patients from six continents included 
The researchers looked at data from 671 hospitals that included six continents …

Once a month shot for type 2 diabetes in the works that is also cheap

Anyone diagnosed with type 2 diabetes know it isn’t easy to manage blood sugar control. One of the barriers is the constant need for monitoring blood sugar and giving injections in the morning and evening - and for some, even more often.
Now there is a drug in development that means one injection that could last for 14-days. The implication is more freedom from the burdensome act of carrying around insulin.
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a  technology that could replace daily and even weekly insulin injections for type 2 diabetes treatment.
What if you only needed insulin once a month?
The insulin is combined with a biopolymer that  keeps insulin circulating in the body for a longer period of time than what is currently on the market. The development could mean insulin injections could be given just once or twice a month, which could be life-changing for those trying to manage type-2 diabetes.
Current therapies that target insulin signaling molecules only last a …