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Showing posts from June, 2017

Could simply listening to Mozart help people with epilepsy?

Listening to music composed by Mozart could help control seizures. The news from researchers add to the health benefits discovered in the past that listening to classical music might help people dealing with epilepsy. The findings that were presented last month at the European College of Neurpsychopharmacology; is a large study and based on reviews of literature that might inspire your doctor to suggest this simple intervention, combined with current treatment. Researchers, Dr. Glanluca Sesso and Dr. Frederico Sicca from the University of Pisa specifically looked at how Mozart's music affects epilepsy. Their review included 9 published studies out of 147; based on solid science and of good quality. Daily listening changes brain signals tooMozart's music also changed brain signals that are commonly seen in patients diagnosed with epilepsy,  in addition to lowering the number of seizures for people that listen to music daily. Tehe reduction varied between 31 and 66 percent. Dr. …

Once a month shot for type 2 diabetes in the works that is also cheap

Anyone diagnosed with type 2 diabetes know it isn’t easy to manage blood sugar control. One of the barriers is the constant need for monitoring blood sugar and giving injections in the morning and evening - and for some, even more often.
Now there is a drug in development that means one injection that could last for 14-days. The implication is more freedom from the burdensome act of carrying around insulin.
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a  technology that could replace daily and even weekly insulin injections for type 2 diabetes treatment.
What if you only needed insulin once a month?
The insulin is combined with a biopolymer that  keeps insulin circulating in the body for a longer period of time than what is currently on the market. The development could mean insulin injections could be given just once or twice a month, which could be life-changing for those trying to manage type-2 diabetes.
Current therapies that target insulin signaling molecules only last a …