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Showing posts from May, 2020

Could simply listening to Mozart help people with epilepsy?

Listening to music composed by Mozart could help control seizures. The news from researchers add to the health benefits discovered in the past that listening to classical music might help people dealing with epilepsy. The findings that were presented last month at the European College of Neurpsychopharmacology; is a large study and based on reviews of literature that might inspire your doctor to suggest this simple intervention, combined with current treatment. Researchers, Dr. Glanluca Sesso and Dr. Frederico Sicca from the University of Pisa specifically looked at how Mozart's music affects epilepsy. Their review included 9 published studies out of 147; based on solid science and of good quality. Daily listening changes brain signals tooMozart's music also changed brain signals that are commonly seen in patients diagnosed with epilepsy,  in addition to lowering the number of seizures for people that listen to music daily. Tehe reduction varied between 31 and 66 percent. Dr. …

Update: Hydroxychloroquine safety study retracted by major medical journal

In a new study from Brigham and Women’s hospital, nearly 16,000 patient outcomes were analyzed that were diagnosed with COVID-19 and received the drug hydroxychloroquine.
Instead of improving, patients were four times more likely to experience dangerous heart irregularity, compared to those not teated with the antimalarial drug.
Patients in the study that were given hydroxychloroquine were also more likely to die.
The study is recently published in the medical journal The Lancet  and is the most recent to address a hot topic about whether the medication, which is also prescribed to treat autoimmune disorders, should be  used to treat COVID-19.
Mandeep R. Mehra, a corresponding study author and executive director of the Brigham’s Center for Advanced Heart  Disease said the drug, or any regimen including a chloroquine,  did not help “no matter which way you examine the data.”
Patients from six continents included 
The researchers looked at data from 671 hospitals that included six continents …