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Showing posts from June, 2020

Plant based diet study debunks eating for your blood type for weight loss, health

You may have read that it's important to eat certain foods based on your blood type. Depending on whether your blood type is O, A, B or AB, proponents of the blood type diet say there are foods to eat and foods to avoid for optimal health and a longer life.  Can eating certain foods based on blood type really help you live longer? The blood type diet was first introduced in 1996 by a naturopathic physician, Peter D'Adamo who alleges that even the spices you put on your food could contribute to better health and should be individualized for your specific blood type.  The theory is that certain foods and even the type of exercise you do should be individualized.  For instance, if you have type O blood you should eat plenty of meat and fish protein, vegetables and fruits but stay away from legumes - at least so the dietary guidelines say.  Recommendations for weight loss include avoiding dairy, corn and wheat and filling up on red meat, broccoli, spinach and olive oil.  Type A ind

Berries, apples and tea can do wonders for your brain

I f you'e looking for an easy way to keep your brain healthy, consider eating more berries, consuming more applies and drinking tea. There's good science to support the benefits of getting started early eating a healthy diet for preventing Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.  Alzheimer's risk significantly lower for older adults who consume these foods Tufts University scientists looked at Alzheimer's disease risk among older adults and compared those that consumed scant amounts of apples, tea and berries that are loaded with antioxidants; published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  The study finding was based on conclusions extracted from dietary questionairres submitted during medical exams among heart disease risk patients participating in the Framingham Heart Study.  One of the important highlights of this study, compared to others is that the risk of the brain disease was analyzed over a 20 year period, versus short term studies that have been