Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from August, 2012

Could simply listening to Mozart help people with epilepsy?

Listening to music composed by Mozart could help control seizures. The news from researchers add to the health benefits discovered in the past that listening to classical music might help people dealing with epilepsy. The findings that were presented last month at the European College of Neurpsychopharmacology; is a large study and based on reviews of literature that might inspire your doctor to suggest this simple intervention, combined with current treatment. Researchers, Dr. Glanluca Sesso and Dr. Frederico Sicca from the University of Pisa specifically looked at how Mozart's music affects epilepsy. Their review included 9 published studies out of 147; based on solid science and of good quality. Daily listening changes brain signals tooMozart's music also changed brain signals that are commonly seen in patients diagnosed with epilepsy,  in addition to lowering the number of seizures for people that listen to music daily. Tehe reduction varied between 31 and 66 percent. Dr. …

Birth control pill for men could become a reality

Other than vasectomy, sexual abstinence or condoms that sometimes fail, there have been no birth control options for men. Researchers think they may have discovered a compound that means a male contraceptive pill could become a reality. The news is good for women who have had the primary responsibility in the birth control arena. 
Researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Baylor College of Medicine report in the  Aug. 17 issue of the journal Cell that they’ve used a compound called JQ1 in male mice to create a form of birth control that seems to have no ill effects.
”Our findings demonstrate that, when given to rodents, this compound produces a rapid and reversible decrease in sperm count and mobility with profound effects on fertility,” said Dana-Farber’s James Bradner, MD, the paper’s senior author in a press release.
J-Q1 was named for the lead chemist, Jun Qi, PhD, in the Bradner laboratory. The compound was originally developed to block a gene that causes cancer, called BRD…