Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from November, 2013

Plant based diet study debunks eating for your blood type for weight loss, health

You may have read that it's important to eat certain foods based on your blood type. Depending on whether your blood type is O, A, B or AB, proponents of the blood type diet say there are foods to eat and foods to avoid for optimal health and a longer life.  Can eating certain foods based on blood type really help you live longer? The blood type diet was first introduced in 1996 by a naturopathic physician, Peter D'Adamo who alleges that even the spices you put on your food could contribute to better health and should be individualized for your specific blood type.  The theory is that certain foods and even the type of exercise you do should be individualized.  For instance, if you have type O blood you should eat plenty of meat and fish protein, vegetables and fruits but stay away from legumes - at least so the dietary guidelines say.  Recommendations for weight loss include avoiding dairy, corn and wheat and filling up on red meat, broccoli, spinach and olive oil.  Type A ind

How sugary drinks might raise a woman's risk of endometrial cancer

Cancer risk higher for women who drink sugary beverages Women who are postmenopausal may be increasing their risk of the most common type of cancer of the uterus, endometrial cancer, according to an observational study. Researchers compared women with high intake of sugar-laden beverages to find the link.  The increase in endometrial cancer was 78 percent higher for women who drank the most sugary beverages.  The study finding, published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, isn't a surprise, said   Maki Inoue-Choi, Ph.D., M.S., R.D., who led this study as a research associate in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health of the  University of Minnesota School of Public Health  in Minneapolis. "Other studies have shown increasing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has paralleled the increase in obesity. Obese women tend to have higher levels of estrogens and insulin than women of normal weight. Increased levels of estrogen