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Showing posts from July, 2014

Plant based diet study debunks eating for your blood type for weight loss, health

You may have read that it's important to eat certain foods based on your blood type. Depending on whether your blood type is O, A, B or AB, proponents of the blood type diet say there are foods to eat and foods to avoid for optimal health and a longer life.  Can eating certain foods based on blood type really help you live longer? The blood type diet was first introduced in 1996 by a naturopathic physician, Peter D'Adamo who alleges that even the spices you put on your food could contribute to better health and should be individualized for your specific blood type.  The theory is that certain foods and even the type of exercise you do should be individualized.  For instance, if you have type O blood you should eat plenty of meat and fish protein, vegetables and fruits but stay away from legumes - at least so the dietary guidelines say.  Recommendations for weight loss include avoiding dairy, corn and wheat and filling up on red meat, broccoli, spinach and olive oil.  Type A ind

Three reasons not to mix booze with energy drinks highlighted by researchers

Researchers warn about risks of energy drinks combined with alcohol Image credit Pixabay.com Researchers warn that mixing alcohol with energy drinks can have negative health and personal consequences. In a small study that included 75 people researchers found booze plus energy drinks can lead to the following: Increased desire for alcohol Hayley Hamilton, a scientist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and co-investigator of the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey aid people mix energy drinks with booze because they think they can drink more. But the combination can drive desire for more alcohol from the stimulating effect of caffeine. “We normally think of alcohol as a depressant, but it also has a stimulant effect, and it is this stimulant effect that is most strongly related to how much we like alcohol, and whether we want to keep drinking,"  says lead author Rebecca McKetin, a fellow with the Center for Research on Aging, Health