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Showing posts from November, 2019

Plant based diet study debunks eating for your blood type for weight loss, health

You may have read that it's important to eat certain foods based on your blood type. Depending on whether your blood type is O, A, B or AB, proponents of the blood type diet say there are foods to eat and foods to avoid for optimal health and a longer life.  Can eating certain foods based on blood type really help you live longer? The blood type diet was first introduced in 1996 by a naturopathic physician, Peter D'Adamo who alleges that even the spices you put on your food could contribute to better health and should be individualized for your specific blood type.  The theory is that certain foods and even the type of exercise you do should be individualized.  For instance, if you have type O blood you should eat plenty of meat and fish protein, vegetables and fruits but stay away from legumes - at least so the dietary guidelines say.  Recommendations for weight loss include avoiding dairy, corn and wheat and filling up on red meat, broccoli, spinach and olive oil.  Type A ind

Do Vitamin D and Fish Oil supplements live up to the hype?

Omega-3 Fish Oil and Vitamin D might not do what you think for health Researchers are again questioning the benefits of  Omega-3 fish oil and vitamin D supplements for quelling inflammation. Both supplements are widely consumed for existing health ailments such as rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases; as well as for preventing obesity, heart disease, cancer, osteoarthritis and Alzheimer's disease. Vitamin D is used to boost immunity; especially for people that don't get enough sunshine.  Researchers now say neither one of the supplements showed any benefit for inflammation in an analysis of a much larger study. But before you dump your supplements, read on. This isn't exactly the final word. Here's what researchers did find about Vitamin D Vitamin D might actually be harmful to the body and increase inflammation - based on at least one blood indicator of systemic inflammation. The three markers tested included interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor

Is Daylight Saving Time Unhealthy?

Experts highlight the health effects of daylight saving time Those of us forced to change our clocks back for Daylight Saving Time might be feeling some ill health effects. Some of those could be long-lasting, according to sleep experts. Daylight Saving Time wreaks havoc with our biological clocks Scientists from Vanderbilt University Medical Center highlight some of unhealthy effects of changing our clocks in Spring and in Fall that include: Increased risk of fatal accidents Stroke Heart attack The list is pretty profound considering these aren't just minor health risks.  Health experts agree DST needs to go away Beth Ann Mallow, MD, Burry Chair in Cognitive Childhood Development and Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics in the Sleep Disorders division at Vanderbilt said in a press release: People think the one-hour transition is no big deal, that they can get over this in a day, but what they don't realize is their biological clock is out of sync. Th

Blood test for breast cancer in the news: What some experts think

Could a simple blood test predict breast cancer before symptoms occur?  Researchers say they are working on a simple blood test that could catch breast cancer five years before symptoms occur that could be available in 4 to 5 years. It appears the possibility of such a blood test is a ‘wait and see’ according to some experts.  Imagine what that would mean - not just for fewer deaths and invasive treatment from cancer - but for lowering healthcare spending and anxiety over mammogram screening.  Findings presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference, Glasgow, UK, highlighted how a blood test has already been developed that detects cancer cell proteins. The blood test, developed specifically for breast cancer, can detect antigens  (TAAs - tumor associated antigens) that researchers say they have found are a reliable indication of breast cancer.  For this study a team of researchers from the University of Nottingham School of Medicine matched blood samples taken from 9