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Showing posts from May, 2017

Plant based diet study debunks eating for your blood type for weight loss, health

You may have read that it's important to eat certain foods based on your blood type. Depending on whether your blood type is O, A, B or AB, proponents of the blood type diet say there are foods to eat and foods to avoid for optimal health and a longer life.  Can eating certain foods based on blood type really help you live longer? The blood type diet was first introduced in 1996 by a naturopathic physician, Peter D'Adamo who alleges that even the spices you put on your food could contribute to better health and should be individualized for your specific blood type.  The theory is that certain foods and even the type of exercise you do should be individualized.  For instance, if you have type O blood you should eat plenty of meat and fish protein, vegetables and fruits but stay away from legumes - at least so the dietary guidelines say.  Recommendations for weight loss include avoiding dairy, corn and wheat and filling up on red meat, broccoli, spinach and olive oil.  Type A ind

Marijuana is the indoor air pollutant no one knew about until now

It isn't just cigarette smoke, candles and cleaners that could be polluting your home. San Diego State University researchers are trying to keep kids safe from indoor pollution. As a means to that end, they recently set up  air particle monitors in the homes of 300 families to find out what happens in the home that might make indoor air unhealthy for children. Smoking pot turned out to be one of those indoor air pollutants that harm you and espeically your kids. Marijuana pops up as home air-pollutant The investigation found cigarettes are still a major source of indoor pollution that exposes children to over 7,000 cancer causing chemicals from second-hand smoke. But in addition to cigarettes, the researchers say marijuana also popped up as a home pollutant in addition to what we already know about other particulate matter from burning candles, frying and cleaning products. "Our primary goal was to figure out what's happening in houses that lead

Why are these 2 skin cancers becoming more common in younger people?

Mayo Clinic researchers find increase in skin cancer Image credit Wikimedia Commons Two types of skin cancer are becoming  more common; one  among women age 30 to 49.  You’ll want to know what to look for, but more importantly how to avoid a trip to the dermatologist that could result in bad news, stress and possibly surgery. Squamous and basal cell skin cancer develop over time These two types of skin cancer, squamous and basal cell take time to develop. If you’ve used tanning beds in the past or spent too many summers in the sun as a child, you could be at risk. The bad news about what researchers recently found is you don’t have to be ‘older’ to develop skin cancer that, in the early stages,  may barely be noticeable or on a skin area that you don’t see every day. The good news is that by being proactive with sunscreen or protective clothing even on cloudy days and having regular skin checkups you can lower your risk and get early treatment for what may have

IsoPSA blood test could replace PSA for prostate cancer and mean fewer biopsies

A better way to diagnose prostate cancer with a simple blood test The PSA test for prostate cancer has been highly criticized because it just doesn’t give enough information and can lead to unnecessary biopsy that can have side effects for men - some of which might not be reversible. Now there is evidence that a test called the IsoPSA could replace the PSA test and reduce the need for prostate biopsy. The finding, published online last month by European Urology , highlights research done by Cleveland Clinic, if validated, could mean men could breathe easier when it comes to worrying about prostate cancer. Test uses traditional PSA information to make a better diagnosis The test uses protein changes found in traditional PSA blood testing to detect prostate cancer in addition to whether a tumor is  high or low grade or even if a tumor is non-cancerous. The finding was presented at the American Urological Association annual meeting , May 10, 2017. PSA test

First study highlights short-term harm to children from pesticides: What you need to know

First study highlights short term harm to children from  garden pesticides  Researchers, for the first time, have found children exposed to pesticides used when harvesting flowers can pose dangers to children. In short, neurotoxins in pesticides known as organophosphates interfere with brain connections that can impact a child’s ability to remember, learn and control behavior. Pesticide exposure shown to lower performance in children "Children examined sooner after the flower harvest displayed lower performance on most measures, such as attention, self-control, visuospatial processing (the ability to perceive and interact with our visual world) and sensorimotor (eye-hand coordination) compared to children examined later in a time of lower flower production and pesticide use." The study was performed in Ecuador, the third largest producer of cut flowers in the world. First author Jose R. Suarez-Lopez, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Famil