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Showing posts from May, 2017

Could simply listening to Mozart help people with epilepsy?

Listening to music composed by Mozart could help control seizures. The news from researchers add to the health benefits discovered in the past that listening to classical music might help people dealing with epilepsy.  The findings that were presented last month at the European College of Neurpsychopharmacology ; is a large study and based on reviews of literature that might inspire your doctor to suggest this simple intervention, combined with current treatment.  Researchers, Dr. Glanluca Sesso and Dr. Frederico Sicca from the University of Pisa specifically looked at how Mozart's music affects epilepsy. Their review included 9 published studies out of 147; based on solid science and of good quality.  Daily listening changes brain signals too Mozart's music also changed brain signals that are commonly seen in patients diagnosed with epilepsy,  in addition to lowering the number of seizures for people that listen to music daily. Tehe reduction varied between 31 and 66 percent. 

Marijuana is the indoor air pollutant no one knew about until now

It isn't just cigarette smoke, candles and cleaners that could be polluting your home. San Diego State University researchers are trying to keep kids safe from indoor pollution. As a means to that end, they recently set up  air particle monitors in the homes of 300 families to find out what happens in the home that might make indoor air unhealthy for children. Smoking pot turned out to be one of those indoor air pollutants that harm you and espeically your kids. Marijuana pops up as home air-pollutant The investigation found cigarettes are still a major source of indoor pollution that exposes children to over 7,000 cancer causing chemicals from second-hand smoke. But in addition to cigarettes, the researchers say marijuana also popped up as a home pollutant in addition to what we already know about other particulate matter from burning candles, frying and cleaning products. "Our primary goal was to figure out what's happening in houses that lead

Why are these 2 skin cancers becoming more common in younger people?

Mayo Clinic researchers find increase in skin cancer Image credit Wikimedia Commons Two types of skin cancer are becoming  more common; one  among women age 30 to 49.  You’ll want to know what to look for, but more importantly how to avoid a trip to the dermatologist that could result in bad news, stress and possibly surgery. Squamous and basal cell skin cancer develop over time These two types of skin cancer, squamous and basal cell take time to develop. If you’ve used tanning beds in the past or spent too many summers in the sun as a child, you could be at risk. The bad news about what researchers recently found is you don’t have to be ‘older’ to develop skin cancer that, in the early stages,  may barely be noticeable or on a skin area that you don’t see every day. The good news is that by being proactive with sunscreen or protective clothing even on cloudy days and having regular skin checkups you can lower your risk and get early treatment for what may have

IsoPSA blood test could replace PSA for prostate cancer and mean fewer biopsies

A better way to diagnose prostate cancer with a simple blood test The PSA test for prostate cancer has been highly criticized because it just doesn’t give enough information and can lead to unnecessary biopsy that can have side effects for men - some of which might not be reversible. Now there is evidence that a test called the IsoPSA could replace the PSA test and reduce the need for prostate biopsy. The finding, published online last month by European Urology , highlights research done by Cleveland Clinic, if validated, could mean men could breathe easier when it comes to worrying about prostate cancer. Test uses traditional PSA information to make a better diagnosis The test uses protein changes found in traditional PSA blood testing to detect prostate cancer in addition to whether a tumor is  high or low grade or even if a tumor is non-cancerous. The finding was presented at the American Urological Association annual meeting , May 10, 2017. PSA test

First study highlights short-term harm to children from pesticides: What you need to know

First study highlights short term harm to children from  garden pesticides  Researchers, for the first time, have found children exposed to pesticides used when harvesting flowers can pose dangers to children. In short, neurotoxins in pesticides known as organophosphates interfere with brain connections that can impact a child’s ability to remember, learn and control behavior. Pesticide exposure shown to lower performance in children "Children examined sooner after the flower harvest displayed lower performance on most measures, such as attention, self-control, visuospatial processing (the ability to perceive and interact with our visual world) and sensorimotor (eye-hand coordination) compared to children examined later in a time of lower flower production and pesticide use." The study was performed in Ecuador, the third largest producer of cut flowers in the world. First author Jose R. Suarez-Lopez, MD, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Famil